A Study

By Dena Linn
 

 

Three shorts, different points of view

Questions to ponder:  Which one do you like best? And why?

Please respond in the Comment Section below.

 

1- I’m on the Road

Carry-on backpack and ultra-light four-wheeled luggage weighing in under twelve kilos – I am ready to go. First layover: Amsterdam and the whole place gives me that wizzy, I’m-an-international traveler oh-my! gaze. Although I do appreciate Starbuck’s reach and they have a counter swamped with baristas and customers where I purchase my pumpkin spiced latte. Next stop is passport control. I stand in line, nice and calm, till the green-go-ahead light flashes and a little glass gate opens, like a cow chute! I whisper moo. I slap my passport into the machine and wait while the optical recognition sensor finds my face and travels up and down by millimeters searching for my eyes.

After hours, various fatty snacks and movies that did not captivate, I land in the Upper Midwestern United States. All the English and the fact I can communicate in that language stuns me to silence. I shuffle, dragging my suitcase, single file, head down, and guilt swarms me, but why? I follow the arrows for US citizens.

The blue-uniformed officer doesn’t need to say “Passport”, ‘cause I am ready.

“So, what brings you back to the US?”

“Turkey, cranberries.” I reply. My heart is beating through my ears. I hate this part. I freeze, my eyes show my fear. Without awareness, I pat my head, smoothing my post-long-haul-flight hair.

“You’ve been out of the United States for over a year.”

“Yes, sir, I don’t live here anymore.”

“Mexico and in and out of Europe through major airports. I need you to step over there, that window, for further processing.”

“Thanksgiving with my son. That’s it!”

“Officer, please escort Ms. Chen.”

I am panicking on the inside, and sure my eyes give me away, and I’m blubbering on the outside about being a US taxpayer and having raised a son and am a pet owner and lots of other stuff. However, the officer’s not interested in anything I say, so I smooth my hair again and walk by the officer’s side praying.

 

 

2 – She’s on the Road

Carry-on backpack and ultra-light four-wheeled luggage weighing in under twelve kilos – she’s ready to go. First layover: Amsterdam and the whole place gives her that wizzy, she’s an international traveler and oh-my gaze. Although she does appreciate Starbuck’s reach and they’ve a counter swamped with baristas and customers where she purchases her pumpkin spiced latte. Next stop is passport control. She stands in line, nice and calm, till the green-go-ahead light flashes and a little glass gate opens, like a cow chute. She catches herself saying moo, and slaps her passport into the machine, then waits while the optical face recognition sensor finds her and travels up and down by millimeters. She hopes it’s searching only for her eyes.

 

After hours, non-halal snacks, which she pre-ordered, and movies that didn’t captivate, she lands in the Upper Midwestern United States. All the English and the fact she can communicate in that language stuns her to silence. She shuffles her feet, dragging her suitcase, single file, head down, guilt swarms her, but she doesn’t know why. She follows the arrows for US citizens. The blue-uniformed officer does not need to say “Passport”, ‘cause she’s ready.

 

“So, what brings you back to the US?”

 

“Turkey, cranberries.” She replies. She puts her hand over her heart and leans. Her face is stiff like stone and her eyes flash fear. She shifts between her feet, biting her lip, and her hand unconsciously pats her head.

 

“You’ve been out of your country for over a year.”

 

“Yes, sir, I don’t live here anymore.”

 

“Mexico and in and out of Europe through major airports. I need you to step over to that window, for further processing.”

 

“Thanksgiving with my son. That’s it!”

 

“Officer, please escort Ms. Chen.”

 

Her face blanches, her eyes grow wide like saucers, and then she blubbers about being a US taxpayer and having raised a son, and she’s a pet owner and lots of other stuff. However, the officer’s not interested in anything she says. She adjusts her hijab over her forehead and walks by the officer’s side praying through still lips.

 

 

 

3 – You’re on the Road

Carry-on backpack and ultra-light four wheeled luggage weighing in under twelve kilos – you’re ready to go. First layover: Amsterdam and the whole place gives you that wizzy, you’re-an-international traveler and oh-my punch. Although you do appreciate Starbuck’s reach and they’ve a counter swamped with baristas and customers where you purchase your pumpkin spiced latte. First stop is passport control. You stand in line, nice and calm, till the green-go-ahead light flashes and a little glass gate opens, like a cow chute!  You intone moo, slap your passport into the machine and wait while the optical recognition sensor finds your ovular face and travels up and down by millimeters searching for your eyes.

 

After hours, various snacks that wrinkle your nose, and movies that don’t captivate enough to waste your time, you land in the Upper Midwestern United States. All the English and the fact you can communicate in that language stuns you to silence. You shuffle, dragging your suitcase, single file, head down. You look guilty, but why? You never shared. You follow the arrows for US citizens.

 

The blue-uniformed officer doesn’t need to say “Passport”, ‘cause you were born ready.

 

“So, what brings you back to the US?”

 

“Turkey, cranberries.” You reply. Your heart beats out of your chest, the evidence pinking your cheeks. You hate this part. You feel foreign and very alone. You, not to draw attention, slide on hand up to pat your headscarf, tresses waiting to spring free.

 

“You’ve been out of the United States for over a year.”

 

“Yes, sir, I don’t live here anymore.”

 

“Mexico and in and out of Europe through major airports. I need you to step over to that window, for further processing.”

 

“Thanksgiving with my son. That’s it!”

 

“Officer, please escort Ms. Chen.”

 

Your hands are shaking, the color gone from your face, and your eyes both wide yet far away. You are blubbering on about being a US taxpayer and having raised a son, and that you owned a pet, and lots of other stuff.  However, the officer’s not interested in anything you say. You stroke your hair, a sure mess under that scarf, and walk by the officer’s side, your head bent in prayer.

Dena Linn

Author

Dena Linn

 

Dena Linn, ex-urban, thriver, commune child, never one of ‘those girls.’ She’s obsessed with humans, not-so-humans, and all others as they discover and live through love, hate, loss, rage, heartbreak, and insanity. Her recent dark fiction publications include: “Get on Home,” published by Hawkshaw Press in their anthology Hard Boiled and Full of Sin, and “Frost,” published in TheChamberMagazine. Other stories are appearing in Down in the Dirt MagazineArielChart International Literary Journal, and her First-Place winner, “The Problem Is,” appears in Prompted, by Reedsy. She is a short story judge for Reedsy.com. She has published six short stories of literary fiction in anthologies produced by Transcendent Authors.

 
Author website: https://linnfiction.com
 

Autumn, An Anthology
“Hunt With Jack” Literary Fiction (Short Story)
“I’m Not Afraid ” Literary Fiction (Short Story)

Spring—The Unexpected
“Spring Rain” Literary Fiction (Short Story)
“Burning Out” Literary Fiction (Short Story)

Winter—An End and a Promise
“Traditions” Romance and Horror (Short Story)
“Chasing the Northern Lights” Literary – Woman’s Fiction (Short Story)

Summer—When Doors Open.
“Watching for Now” – Contemporary Literary

Deceit
“Deception in Diamonds”

Kathleen-Osborne

An Interview with Aletta Bee
by Kathleen Osborne

Welcome to this section in our newsletter.

We hope you enjoy hearing a more about each of our authors.

Aletta-Bee

Transcendent Authors

Anthologies

Tolerance Anthology
Autumn-An Anthology
Spring-The Unexpected
Winter-An-End-and-a-Promise
Summer-When Doors Open
Summer-When Doors Open

Our most recent release

It’s hard to believe, after all our hard work, Deceit, our sixth book, is available to you in e-book and paperback.

AND… We have completed the Seasons Series with the release of our last book, Summer—When Doors Open. Our current book release is similar to our very first anthology, Tolerance. Our new collection is called Deceit. It contains ten stories for you to enjoy and was released in November.

Deceit… Our lives are full of deceit, from the little white lie a person might tell to a lie of omission to the world by its leaders spouting untruths. Deceit can come packaged as protection yet is actually deception meant to harm another. Countries involved in covert to overt manipulation attempting to change their status or political influence are seen every day, revealed by the press, bloggers, social influencers.

The thing is, can you trust them ? It’s the little things each of us do that prove out as either intentional, or not–how you can tell the difference?

Let the Transcendent Authors fifth book unravel deceit in its many forms.

Kathleen Osborne

Kathleen Osborne
Founder

DECEIT is here!!

A Word from the Founder

Thank you! A great big hug and thank you to those who helped make out launch party for Deceit such a success. Our hope is that you had as much fun as we did. You are fabulous guests; it was such a pleasure having a chance to get to know our readers. We are looking forward to seeing you in November of 2024 for Fate, our next anthology, launch party.

We will you all a safe and happy holiday.

Hugs,
Kathleen